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الأربعاء، 10 أكتوبر 2012

Thief steals goat only to return it to petting zoo hours later with bright pink pedicure

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A pumpkin patch goat that had its nails painted bright pink overnight was kidnapped by a young woman who gave the animal a pedicure overnight and then returned the animal to its enclosure.
Surveillance video shows the unknown woman taking the animal from its enclosure for the apparent prank at the PB Pumpkin Patch in San Diego, California, where owners were shocked to find the animal with a freshly painted pedicure on Monday morning
A review of surveillance video from the previous night revealed the kidnapping and pedicure that coincided with Breast Cancer Awareness Month, during which the color pink is used to raise awareness of the disease.
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Surprise: A thief swiped a live goat only to return it hours later with its nails painted bright pink
Surprise: A thief swiped a live goat only to return it hours later with its nails painted bright pink
Video footage posted by Fox 5 San Diego shows the thief, who appears to be a young, slim woman in her 20s, hoisting a small goat over a white picket fence as she returns the animal to an enclosed bed of hay where it was kept.
The woman then jumps over the fence and picks up the goat to pose for a picture with the animal.
A young man outside the fence snaps her picture while he puffs on a cigarette.
 
The owners of the pumpkin patch, which is located across the street from a high school, are not pursuing any legal action concerning the incident.
Harmless: The goat snatcher and her accomplice returned the goat unharmed to its home
Harmless: The goat snatcher and her accomplice returned the goat safely to its home
Just last year, four teenagers were arrested for snatching goats from Norte Vista High School outside Los Angeles, which less than 100 miles from the pumpkin patch.
The teenagers stole nine goats from the high school, where students were raising the animals for an agriculture project, and tried to sell them for cash.
Police eventually recovered seven of the stolen goats.

The mane event: Thousands gather to watch barbaric tradition of horses forced to fight in rural China

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With adrenaline pumping, manes whipping and a screaming crowd surrounding them, these two stallions are fighting tooth and hoof as they are pitted against each other in a traditional Chinese horse fight.
The event was arranged to celebrate the end of the autumn harvest in Rongshui County, in the province of Guangxi, and saw the locals gather to watch what animal rights campaigners have called ‘cruel’ and ‘barbaric’.
Horse fights are popular in rural China, as well as in many other parts of Asia, where the ‘sport’ goes back over 500 years.
Fierce fight: One stallion jump to attack another in the traditional event in Rongshui County, China
Fierce fight: One stallion jump to attack another in the traditional event in Rongshui County, China
All about the girl: In order to make the horses aggressive the farmers keep a mare in heat nearby which pits the stallions against each other
All about the girl: In order to make the horses aggressive the farmers keep a mare in heat nearby, pitting the stallions against each other
Crowdpleaser: The gathered watch intently as two young horses go head to head with many having picked a favourite ahead of the battle
Crowdpleaser: The gathered watch intently as two young horses go head to head with many having picked a favourite ahead of the battle
Two stallions are led to a mare in heat, which is taken away when the stallions are aroused, leading them to fight each other.
If the stallions still refuse to fight then organisers use other methods to anger and frighten them such as whipping the creatures or firing guns in the air.
 
Vivian Farrell, President of the International Fund For Horses, which has led campaigns to ban horse fighting, said: 'It's cruel and inhumane and I don't know why they do it.
'It is very hard to tackle. They say it's a tradition. Well, it used to be a tradition to sacrifice children, but we've moved on from that.
No sport: The event, held to celebrate the autumn harvest has been part of Chinese rural life for centuries, although human rights campaigners have branded it 'barbaric'
No sport: The event, held to celebrate the autumn harvest has been part of Chinese rural life for centuries, although human rights campaigners have branded it 'barbaric'
Battle: The two horses fight on their hind legs with teeth bared as the crowd cheers
Battle: The two horses fight on their hind legs with teeth bared as the crowd cheers
'Sadly it is mostly driven by the Chinese love of gambling, although people get fired up over the blood, gore and intensity of the fighting.'
A spokesperson for PETA added: 'Torturing these magnificent animals in the name of entertainment is deplorable. Tradition never justifies cruelty and has no place in a civilised society.'
Horse fighting has been outlawed almost worldwide, but it still thrives in countries like the Philippines, Indonesia, South Korea and China.
Moneymakers: It is common for the spectators to bet on the outcome of the horsefights
Moneymakers: It is common for the spectators to bet on the outcome of the horse fights